Current Program

The Gambia | Agricultural Project 

(Jan. 2016- present)



The Njau community in The Gambia of approximately 2000 individuals shares a gardening space that suffers from yearly water shortages. There is an adjacent valley that overflows with water during the rainy season (September), but halfway through harvest (December) the water dries up and the crops fail to grow.


EWB-OSU plans to alleviate and provide a solution to the major issues by partnering with the Women’s Initiative The Gambia and the Njau Community Leadership to address the community’s need for access to sustainable water. The team took their first assessment trip to The Gambia in May 2016 and again in December 2016. Currently, we are assessing the household and garden surveys completed by the community and are going to begin brainstorming possible solutions and hope to go into implementation soon. These are the possible projects we are in the process of getting approved, fundraised, and into the implementation phase.

Irrigation Improvement

Our main goal during our five-year project with Njau, Gambia is to implement a new irrigation system for the gardens.  These efforts will allow the community to lengthen their growing season while providing food and a source of income for the families.  We will partner with a local company WaterPoint Gambia to implement this project with an estimated cost of $20,000 dollars.

Fence Upgrade

The fences surrounding the gardens are in need of repair and improvement.  Currently, the fences are pieces of scrap wood intertwined with wire to keep out the animals.  These fences are neither strong enough nor high enough to keep out goats, cows, and donkeys during the dry season when the animals are allowed to roam free.  New fences need to be constructed to protect the crops during the dry season.  The estimated cost for this effort is $10,000.

Couscous Milling Machine

Couscous is a commonly grown crop in Njau and is a source of income for many families.  The local milling machine has been broken for years and as such families send their kids on a two-hour walk to the nearest community to pay to use their milling machine. This project is an easy fix and will help to save the community money and time. The estimated cost for this project is $2,300.